7 ideas for covering Small Business Saturday

By David Arkin, Local Media Association 

Small business Saturday, which is Nov. 25 this year, has become a big deal in many communities across the country as shoppers are eager to find deals and support local shops.

Previewing and covering Small Business Saturday is a no brainer for any media company. One, helping people know where to shop locally is a good useful service and two, capturing the dollars that are being spent locally for the holiday, is a good news story.

Here are a few ideas you can consider:

1. Note the best deals

This story by FOX 13 in Tampa breaks down where the best deals are for Small Business Saturday. This takes some leg work but worth it to help your audience figure out where they should spend time.

2. Make a map

Through the American Express site you can build a map of the local shops in your area that are taking part in the day. This is a great tool to provide your audience and easy to do. You can also list all of the stores taking part like Community Impact Newspaper did.

3. Follow a small business

On Black Friday, journalists sometimes capture what it’s like for workers dealing with the mad rush. Do the same for Small Business Saturday. Be with a small business owner throughout the day. It’s likely chaotic but in a very different way than Black Friday for a big box store.

4. Tell the story in numbers

In a by the numbers approach, tell the story of Small Business Saturday. This would include number of small businesses in your community, number of new small businesses opened this year, their economic impact, etc.

5. Share events

Many communities hold festivals and events for Small Business Saturday. Create a list of those like Fredricksburg.com did.

6. Preview and cover it

The Northwest Times wrote a nice piece talking to shops about the day and the Southeast Missourian captured some beautiful photos of shoppers out and about on Small Business Saturday.

7. Editorialize it

Tell your audience why they should support the cause using your media company’s editorial voice. A good piece by The Oregonian.